Must-See Historic Spots in Jasper County, South Carolina

//Must-See Historic Spots in Jasper County, South Carolina

Must-See Historic Spots in Jasper County, South Carolina

Jasper County, South Carolina has a long-standing history in the Lowcountry and important moments from America’s past are evident throughout the county and the neighboring towns of Savannah and Charleston.

While Jasper County’s involvement in the Civil and Revolutionary war were not recognized on a massive scale, what happened in the past plays a big role in how it shaped the county and the south we know today and what took place might surprise you.

From standing on the grounds that confederate and union soldiers once fought on to being able to tour historic properties that were once the headquarters of famous generals, Jasper County never fails to provide a different perspective in to our country’s past.

Pratt Memorial Library

Pratt Memorial Library

This historic building is ideal for a true bibliophile and history buff. Donated by Pauline Dodge Pratt, the library was donated to the county in honor of her late husband, Frederic R. Pratt.

When Pauline remarried to Richard K. Webel, nationally renowned architect, the Pratt Memorial Library’s Garden was designed by the architect himself and continues to attract locals and visitors to the library to admire his work.

Filled with almost 300 books, the Pratt Memorial Library offers rare insight in to the past of Jasper County, South Carolina. The library also boasts more than 200 portraits and maps of the lowcountry area so that visitors are able to really see how Jasper County looked and get a true lay of the land.

Church of the Holy Trinity

Church of the Holy Trinity

Once a place of worship for enslaved African Americans in the 1850’s, the Church of the Holy Trinity has grown in to a historic landmark for the locals of Ridgeland, South Carolina.

This Episcopal Church was one of the few things spared in the Civil War because it was being used as a headquarters for the Federal troops.

The stunning example of Carpenter Gothic architecture can still be seen today along with a pipe organ in the gallery, the three-staged bell tower and original wheel window, all adding to the beautiful and historic appearance of the church.

Frampton House Museum

Frampton House Museum

The Frampton House Museum was once the site of “The Hill” Plantation and owned by John Edward Frampton in the 1800’s. Although General Sherman’s burned the plantation house and surrounding farm houses to the ground, John Frampton rebuilt and continued to work on the land.

Major renovations were done to the house throughout the 1900’s and eventually was bought by individual owners. However, in 1991, the Lowcountry Tourism Commission was able to secure the donation of the house and four surrounding acres to eventually become the Lowcountry Visitors Center & Museum that we know today.

Visitors are able to tour the house, learn about its history and even see the various displays created to depict other local attractions in Jasper County.

Honey Hill Battle Site

Honey Hill Battle Site

This site marks the historic Honey Hill Battle where Confederate soldiers were able to push back on the Union troops by setting a field of grass on fire resulting in victory.

The Confederate troops were vastly outnumbered having 4,000 less soldiers than the Union troops, but with quick thinking they were able to divert the enemy and claim one of the last battles for the south during the Civil War.

Euhaw Baptist Church

Euhaw Baptist Church

Although the building you see today is relatively new, the original Euhaw Baptist Church was built in the 1750’s as part of the Charles Town Baptist Association on Euhaw Creek. Like many historical sites, the original building was burned to the ground by the Union troops, luckily to be restored later on.

These days you will find two beautiful towers on either side of the entrance of the current structure and services are still able to be held inside.

Click here to learn more about the history of Jasper County, South Carolina.

2021-08-24T11:40:20-04:00 August 24th, 2021|Uncategorized|